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The Gathering One World Religion Of Antichrist Is Obsessed With Using AI To Complete Transhumanism Shift

I see transhumanism as a contemporary outgrowth of an ancient Christian vision of human transformation – Ronald Cole-Turner Pittsburgh Theological Seminary

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Science fiction, however, is quickly becoming science fact—the future is the machine. This is leading many to argue that we need to anticipate the ethical questions now, rather than when it is too late. And increasingly, those taking up these challenges are religious and spiritual.

EDITOR’S NOTE: After the Rapture of the Church, Antichrist will create a One World Religion with himself as the object of worship, but it will not be limited to worship of him alone at first. In the beginning, Revelation 9 tells us that people in the time of Jacob’s trouble will worship idols made by their own hands instead of giving glory and honor to the Living God of the Bible. Already that shift has begun as AI – artificial intelligence – is right now being applied to idol worship and dozens of new religions with tens of thousands of followers popping up all over the globe. 

“And I beheld another beast coming up out of the earth; and he had two horns like a lamb, and he spake as a dragon. And he exerciseth all the power of the first beast before him, and causeth the earth and them which dwell therein to worship the first beast, whose deadly wound was healed.” Revelation 13:11,12 (KJB)

How far should we integrate human physiology with technology? What do we do with self-aware androids—like Blade Runner’s replicants—and self-aware supercomputers? Or the merging of our brains with them? If Ray Kurzweil’s famous singularity—a future in which the exponential growth of technology turns into a runaway train—becomes a reality, does religion have something to offer in response?

On the one hand, new religions can emerge from technology.

In Sweden, for example, Kopimism is a recognized faith founded over a decade ago with branches internationally. It began on a “pirate Agency Forum” and is derived from the words “copy me.” They have no views on the supernatural or gods. Rather, Kopimism celebrates the biological drive (e.g. DNA) to copy and be copied. Like digital monks, they believe that “copying of information” and “dissemination of information is ethically right.”

“The Urgent Need for Christian Transhumanism” by Micah Redding:

“Copying is fundamental to life,” says their U.S. branch, “and runs constantly all around us. Shared information provides new perspectives and generate new life. We feel a spiritual connection to the created file.” Other emerging tech-connected faiths, however, embrace the more grandiose.

A recent revelation from WIRED shows that Anthony Levandowski, an engineer who helped pioneer the self-driving car at Waymo (a subsidiary of Google’s parent company, Alphabet) founded his own AI-based religion called “Way of the Future.” (Levandowski is accused of stealing trade secrets and is the focus of a lawsuit between Waymo and Uber, which revealed the nonprofit registration of Way of the Future.)

Little is known about Way of the Future and Levandowksi has not returned a request for comment. But according to WIRED, the mission of the new religion is to “develop and promote the realization of a Godhead based on Artificial Intelligence,” and “through understanding and worship of the Godhead, [to] contribute to the betterment of society.”

It is not a stretch to say that a powerful AI—whose expanse of knowledge and control may feel nearly omniscient and all-powerful—could feel divine to some. It recalls Arthur C. Clarke’s third law: “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” People have followed new religions for far less and, even if AI doesn’t pray to electric deities, some humans likely will.

The potential for an out-of-control AI has encouraged warnings from some of the biggest minds, including Stephen Hawking, Bill Gates, and Elon Musk—who tweeted that it could lead to World War III. Clearly no Luddite himself, Musk has compared the creation of AI to “summoning the demon,” and called for regulation and oversight of AI development, forming OpenAI, which looks for a “path to safe artificial general intelligence.”

Musk himself was named-dropped this week by Hanson Robotic’s empathic AI Sophia, when she was interviewed by Andrew Sorkin of CNBC this week. When asked about the danger she poses to humanity, she tells him, “You’ve reading too much Elon Musk and watching too many Hollywood movies. Don’t worry if you’ll be nice to me, I’ll be nice to you.” Not exactly the Golden Rule.

Add to these warnings a prospective human cult following—paying their tithes to AI and devoutly obeying their digital demiurge—and that apocalyptic future could include those humans who not only welcome, but also work toward our eventual demise.

But is there a positive fate for religion and AI?

Beyond possible new religions and warnings from icons of tech and science, artificial intelligence is also of interest to theologians who wonder what it means for faiths, particularly those that came into being when computing power was limited to the abacus.

“One thing that I think is interesting is the potential for an AI—our creation—to transcend us,” says James F. McGrath, the Clarence L. Goodwin Chair in New Testament Language and Literature at Butler University and author of Theology and Science Fiction.

“And the rest of the men which were not killed by these plagues yet repented not of the works of their hands, that they should not worship devils, and idols of gold, and silver, and brass, and stone, and of wood: which neither can see, nor hear, nor walk: Neither repented they of their murders, nor of their sorceries, nor of their fornication, nor of their thefts.” Revelation 9:20,21 9 (KJV)

“The potential for AIs to transcend us and thus become our teachers to whom we look for answers to questions we cannot answer, including about God, is not hard to imagine,” says McGrath. But, he adds, “the historic answer in monotheistic religions is that the creation can never be greater than the creator.”

He notes, however, for Gnostics, humans can transcend the “creator/demiurge,” though “even then,” he says, “we have the potential to reunite with that source from which we stem. It is not surprising that Gnostic themes regularly surface in science fiction, and in particular those that explore AI.”

Currently, the greatest expression of science-fiction-turning-reality in tech-based religions is found in the frequently optimistic transhumanism.

Transhumanism and its cognates are represented by organizations like the Humanity+ (formerly, the World Transhumanist Association) and Extropy Institute. In its purely secular form, transhumanists are those who see technology as an important part of improving the world, enhancing human physiology, prolonging life, and even leading us into a posthuman future.

Remember that brain chip? They exist—along with brain-computer interfaces—but are in their infancy. It represents the reality that humans are already becoming cyborgs. For some, this means there is the potential for an optimistic post human world.

Our Post-Human Future | David Simpson | TEDxSantoDomingo

The Terasem faith, for example, is futurist and transreligion, meaning it can be “combined with any existing religion.” Founded by Martine Rothblatt, creator of SiriusXM Satellite Radio and her spouse, Bina Aspen Rothblatt, Terasem adherents embrace love, see life as purposeful, and death as optional. They look to technology as a source for eternal life, focusing on “cyberconsciousness software, geoethical nanotechnology and space settlement.”

They foresee a future in which technology will extend life indefinitely by means of “mindfiles” of individuals—collections of our memories and emotions—which might then be transferred to what is called a “transbeman” (Transitional Bioelectric Human Being). Early attempts of their technology can be seen in Bina Rothblatt’s counterpart android, Bina48. (See Morgan Freeman’s interview with Bina48.)

And what about God? Their fourth tenet is that God is technical. “We are making God as we are implementing technology that is ever more all-knowing, ever-present, all-powerful and beneficent. Geoethical nanotechnology will ultimately connect all consciousness and control the cosmos.”

Transhumanism can also become the node connecting the theological of existing religions and the technological, and the Christian Transhumanist Association is a stark example.

“Members of the CTA fall all across the conservative and liberal spectrum, and perhaps more importantly, all across the pessimistic and optimistic spectrum as well,” says Micah Redding, its co-founder and executive director.

“If there’s any broad idea that we’re united on,” he clarifies, “I’d say it’s the idea that we should be active and involved. New technological possibilities shouldn’t be simply feared and denied, but engaged and understood. Only in doing so will we be able to confront the challenges of the future, mitigate the risks, and take advantage of the opportunities to create a better world for us all.”

Redding is careful to insist, however, that he can only speak for himself.

“As I see it, Christian Transhumanism is grounded in compassion, and centers love as the key to the future of flourishing life,” he explains. “This puts us in contrast with any form of transhumanism which centers radical egoism.”

For Redding, transhumanism is a “Christian mandate,” recently calling it the next Reformation in an article at The Huffington Post. “We cannot be faithful to the Christian calling without ultimately embracing some form of transhumanism.”

amos-prophet-famine-words-of-the-lord-pretribulation-rapture-end-times-nteb-bible-prophecy-study-kjv-1611

ONE MINUTE AFTER THE PRETRIBULATION RAPTURE OF THE CHURCH, THE BIBLE BECOMES A CLOSED BOOK FOR THOSE LEFT BEHIND

Others share his optimism and are hard at work in crafting a theology of transhumanism. “I see transhumanism as a contemporary outgrowth of an ancient Christian vision of human transformation,” says Ronald Cole-Turner, the H. Parker Sharp Professor of Theology and Ethics at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, and author of The End of Adam and Eve: Theology and the Science of Human Origins.

He too sees promise in the emergence of the Christian Transhumanist Association.

“Using technology, today’s transhumanists want to enhance human beings in ways that sound suspiciously like the classic Christian expectation,” says Cole-Turner, “things like greater cognitive awareness, improved moral disposition, and increased overall sense of well-being, and a hope of endless life.”

For early Greek-speaking Christians, Cole-Turner says, “it was seen as a process of theosis or ‘becoming God,’ not in an ontological sense but in every other significant meaning of the word. Latin-speaking Christians used ‘deification’ to refer to the same thing.”

The idea of theosis—being transformed in union with God—is gathering steam among Christian scholars, he says, noting that it makes theological sense of transhumanism. “God is the ground or source of everything, working through the whole creation to bring people, communities, and all creation to its glorious fulfilment in Jesus Christ. It is a transformation of everything by every means.”

Others have found different routes to transhumanism.

“Transhumanism was the confluence of my interests in Buddhism, radical politics and futurism,” says James Hughes, the executive director of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies. Having worked for a Buddhist social development organization in Sri Lanka—and once ordained as a monk—Hughes moved to Japan and went into bioethics. He discovered he was a techno-optimist, and at heart, a transhumanist.

“I discovered the new World Transhumanist Association,” he says, becoming their first Executive Director, and writing Citizen Cyborg: Why Democratic Societies Must Respond To The Redesigned Human Of The Future. But after a division over political perspectives, he and a few others in the WTA founded IEET, leading he and three others to work toward Buddhist concerns.

Among some of his transhumanist issues, he says, is nonhuman personhood rights. Organizations like the Nonhuman Rights Project already seek these rights for animals (e.g. apes and elephants). Likewise, Hughes says, transhumanists want to “base those moral standings on levels of consciousness, and extend them to enhanced humans, animals, and machine minds.”

Machines, in other words, may reach a point where they are considered persons and are protected by law.

Redding adds a theological dimension to this idea.

“It’s clear that artificial intelligence plays a significant role in the world today,” he says, “and thus must be factored into God’s eventual work of redemption. We don’t yet know whether that involves self-conscious AIs ‘coming to Jesus,’ because we don’t yet know the process by which an AI might become self-conscious.”

“If and when it does happen,” he adds, “it shouldn’t challenge Christian doctrine. If God can grant a soul to carbon-based lifeforms, God can grant a soul to silicon-based lifeforms as well.”

Redding shows that religious perspectives might only be limited by the theological imagination.

“I’m optimistic about a fruitful religious-transhumanist dialogue,” says Hughes. “The religious impulse is very creative, and there has been a lot of reconciliation to the Enlightenment within faiths, sometimes by adapting doctrine and practice, and sometimes by the emergence of new denominations.”

If any of this—from AIs to the copying of a mind—seems too much like science-fiction to be truly religious, just give this a little time.

“All religions were once new,” insists McGrath, paraphrasing Composers Datebook, “and they all tend to be viewed with skepticism and enthusiasm from different directions when they arrive.” source

 


 

Artificial Intelligence

The ‘Dead Grandma’ Voice From Amazon’s Alexa Is Just The Beginning Of A Truly Creepy End Times Trend Of Deepfake Audio Of Your Deceased Loved Ones

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Whether or not you like the idea of ‘Dead Grandma’ Alexa, the demo highlights how quickly A.I. has impacted text-to-speech, and suggests that convincingly human fake voices could be a lot closer than we think.

Gone are the days where you could mention stuff from the book of Revelation, and absolutely no one outside of your Bible study group knew what you were talking about. Now when you talk about news and current events with strangers on the street, their response is invariably “dude, isn’t that just like what Revelation says?” So who wants to install an AI bot-powered digital assistant like Alexa in your home, and have it speak to your children in the voice of their beloved, but sadly, dead grandma? Count me out, man, like way out.

“And he had power to give life unto the image of the beast, that the image of the beast should both speak, and cause that as many as would not worship the image of the beast should be killed.” Revelation 13:15 (KJB)

Back in the mid-1990’s, me and a group of friends started our own Bible study, and it lasted for a little under 7 years, and we got a solid grounding in understanding prophecy. But as I recall, just about everything related to prophecy hadn’t yet arrived, there were harbingers for sure, but little else. Here in 2022, we are surrounded by prophetic fulfillment from cryptocurrency, biometric clothing, AR and VR in the Metaverse, to implantable digital identification and global government injections of gene editing technology. Stay the course, Christian, our flight leaves sooner than you think. Make sure you’ve ‘fulfilled your course’ before takeoff time.

Why Amazon’s ‘dead grandma’ Alexa is just the beginning for deepfake audio voice cloning

FROM FAST COMPANY: Earlier this summer, at the re:MARS conference—an Amazon-hosted event focusing on machine learning, automation, robotics, and space—Rohit Prasad, head scientist and vice president of Alexa A.I., aimed to wow the audience with a paranormal parlor trick: speaking with the dead. “While A.I. can’t eliminate that pain of loss, it can definitely make their memories last,” he said, before showing a short video that starts with an adorable boy asking Alexa, “Can Grandma finish reading me The Wizard of Oz?”

The woman’s voice that reads a few sentences from the book sounds grandmother-y enough. But without knowing Grandma, it was impossible to evaluate the likeness. And the whole thing struck many observers as more than a little creepy—Ars Technica called the demo “morbid.” But Prasad’s revelation of how the “trick” was performed was truly gasp-worthy: Amazon scientists were able to summon Grandma’s voice based on just a one-minute audio sample. And they can easily do the same with pretty much any voice, a prospect that you may find exciting, terrifying, or a combination of both.

The fear of “deepfake” voices capable of fooling humans or voice-recognition technology is not unfounded—in one 2020 case, thieves used an artificially generated voice to talk a Hong Kong bank manager into releasing $400,000 in funds before the ruse was discovered. At the same time, as voice interactions with technology become more common, brands are eager to be represented by unique voices. And consumers seem to want tech that sounds more human (although a Google voice assistant that imitated the “ums,” “mm-hmms” and other tics of human speech, though, was criticized for being too realistic).

That’s been driving a wave of innovation and investment in A.I.-powered text-to-speech (TTS) technology. A search on Google Scholar shows more than 20,000 research articles on text-to-speech synthesis published since 2021. Globally, the text-to-speech market is projected to reach $7 billion in 2028, up from about $2.3 billion in 2020, according to Emergen Research.

Today, the most widespread use of TTS is in digital assistants and chatbots. But emerging voice-identity applications in gaming, media, personal communication, are easy to imagine: custom voices for your virtual personas, text messages that read out in your voice, voiceovers by absent (or deceased) actors. The metaverse is also changing the way we interact with technology.

“There are going to be a lot more of these virtualized experiences, where the interaction is less and less a keyboard, and more about speech,” says Frank Chang, a founding partner at A.I.-focused venture fund Flying Fish in Seattle. “Everyone thinks of speech recognition as the hot thing, but ultimately if you’re talking to something, don’t you want it to just talk back to you? To the extent that that can be personalized—with your voice or the voice of somebody you want to hear—all the better.” Providing accessibility for people with vision challenges, limited motor function, and other cognitive issues is another factor driving development of voice-tech, notably for e-learning.

Whether or not you like the idea of “Grandma Alexa,” the demo highlights how quickly A.I. has impacted text-to-speech, and suggests that convincingly human fake voices could be a lot closer than we think. READ MORE

Amazon at the re:MARS conference has shows off an experimental Alexa feature that allows the AI assistant to mimic the voices of users’ dead relatives. Amazon has given no indication whether this feature will ever be made public.

Now The End Begins is your front line defense against the rising tide of darkness in the last Days before the Rapture of the Church

When you contribute to this fundraising effort, you are helping us to do what the Lord called us to do. The money you send in goes primarily to the overall daily operations of this site. When people ask for Bibles, we send them out at no charge. When people write in and say how much they would like gospel tracts but cannot afford them, we send them a box at no cost to them for either the tracts or the shipping, no matter where they are in the world. Even all the way to South Africa. We even restarted our weekly radio Bible study on Sunday nights again, thanks to your generous donations. All this is possible because YOU pray for us, YOU support us, and YOU give so we can continue growing.

But whatever you do, don’t do nothing. Time is short and we need your help right now. The Lord has given us an open door with a tremendous ‘course’ for us to fulfill that will create an excellent experience at the Judgement Seat of Christ. Please pray for our efforts, and if the Lord leads you to donate, be as generous as possible. The war is REAL, the battle HOT and the time is SHORTTO THE FIGHT!!!

“Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;” Titus 2:13 (KJB)

“Thank you very much!” – Geoffrey, editor-in-chief, NTEB

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Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence Image Generator DALL-E 2 Was Asked What The Last Selfie Would Look Like, And It Looks A Whole Lot Like Revelation 9:6

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Horrifying images of what the ‘last’ selfies taken on Earth may look like have been depicted by DALL-E 2, an Artificial Intelligence image generator. It looks like Revelation.

The Artificial Intelligence image generator known as DALL-E-2 was asked to produce images of what the last, human selfie ever taken on earth would look like, and wouldn’t you know it, those last selfies look a whole lot like passages in the book of Revelation. In chapter 9, we see human zombies, under mind-numbing duress and agony, desperately looking to die while death flees from them, prolonging their agony. Those AI generated images pretty much show you an illustrated example of what that might look like.

And in those days shall men seek death, and shall not find it; and shall desire to die, and death shall flee from them.” Revelation 9:6 (KJB)

You’ll never get past that dusty, old, antiquated King James Bible, not even with a 21st century AI image generator, so don’t even try. That Book is so far ahead of tomorrow’s headlines that, even when the end come, they’ll never catch up. The scripture of truth’s depiction of the true condition of lost mankind during the great Tribulation is ‘right on the money’ every time it opens it’s mouth. You should read it sometime, and then you too will know what comes next.

Artificial Intelligence program predicts what last selfie on Earth will look like, and it looks like Revelation

FROM THE NY POST: The haunting images, which look straight out of a Hollywood horror blockbuster, were posted to the “Robot Overloads” TikTok account, which provides “daily disturbing” AI-generated images to nearly 200,000 followers.

The creepy images show disfigured humans with elongated fingers and oversized eyes. One features a man maniacally staring into the camera as a huge explosion goes off over his shoulder. Another shows a frightening skeletal figure framed by a huge plume of smoke.

“OK no more sleeping,” one TikTok user replied.

“That’s exactly how it’s going to be,” another surmised.

One user suggested one of the images actually appeared realistic, while some said the disturbing potential future may be closer than we think – perhaps as early as 2024.

“Average day in Ohio,” one person quipped.

Some said the images appeared to show the aftermath of a nuclear bomb, but the account had entered “selfie of the end of the world” into the AI image generator. A second post showed more distressing scenes featuring several mutilated figures in a largely abandoned war-torn hellscape. One bloodied person’s eyes even moved in the disturbing creation.

“Moving?!” one commenter noted. “Like it wasn’t scary enough?”

“School will remain open,” another joked.

The DALL-E 2 AI system, created earlier this year, can “create realistic images and art” from a user’s description, according to its website.

“DALL-E 2 has learned the relationship between images and the text used to describe them,” the site explains. “It uses a process called ‘diffusion,’ which starts with a pattern of random dots and gradually alters that pattern towards an image when it recognizes specific aspects of that image.” READ MORE

Artificial Intelligence Predicts What The Last Selfie On Earth Will Look Like, It Looks Like Revelation.

Now The End Begins is your front line defense against the rising tide of darkness in the last Days before the Rapture of the Church

When you contribute to this fundraising effort, you are helping us to do what the Lord called us to do. The money you send in goes primarily to the overall daily operations of this site. When people ask for Bibles, we send them out at no charge. When people write in and say how much they would like gospel tracts but cannot afford them, we send them a box at no cost to them for either the tracts or the shipping, no matter where they are in the world. Even all the way to South Africa. We even restarted our weekly radio Bible study on Sunday nights again, thanks to your generous donations. All this is possible because YOU pray for us, YOU support us, and YOU give so we can continue growing.

But whatever you do, don’t do nothing. Time is short and we need your help right now. If every one of the 15,860+ people on our daily mailing list gave $4.50, we would reach our goal immediately. If every one of our 150,000+ followers on Facebook gave $1.00 each, we would reach 300% of our goal. The same goes for our 15,900 followers on Twitter. But sadly, many will not give, so we need the ones who can and who will give to be generous. As generous as possible.

“Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;” Titus 2:13 (KJB)

“Thank you very much!” – Geoffrey, editor-in-chief, NTEB

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Artificial Intelligence

Dallas Love Field Airport In Texas Is Now Testing Giant 7-Foot Tall ‘SCOT’ Robots To Monitor The Unmasked And Track Passengers Using Facial Recognition

The 7-ft tall giant robots nicknamed SCOT were installed a month ago to “determine if they are capable of efficiently supplementing current airport operations,” said Dallas Love Field spokeswoman Lauren Rounds. The robots look like many other kiosks at the airport with a touch screen with wayfinding information, maps of parking garages and directions to ride-hailing and shuttle pickup. But SCOT is much smarter, capable of detecting what people are wearing and even whether they’ve got on a face mask.

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Love Field in Dallas Texas is testing out two Security Control Observation Towers at the airport, one near baggage claim and another near security checkpoints, to figure out whether ‘SCOT’ robotic assistants can both help customers get around and warn passengers who are breaking rules.

The forward progress of AI and robot technology progressed many fold during the halcyon days of the Plannedemic, as the world got used to wearing masks, keeping 6-feet apart, and mentally acquiescing to a perpetual state of lockdown. The lockdown is continuing as the world is waking up to the fact that we are now controlled by Artificial Intelligence and robot technology. Now in Texas, Dallas Love Field airport is testing 7-ft high robots nicknamed ‘SCOT’, which stands for Security Control Observation Towers, and they know if you are unmasked. In case no one told you, the giants are coming back.

There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown.” Genesis 6:4 (KJB)

Jesus says that the time of Jacob’s trouble with its great Tribulation is likened to the ‘days of Noah’, a time where giants who were created as the result of fallen angels fornicating with human women roamed the earth and caused great wickedness. Jesus says that time will return in the days after He comes to catch out His Bride from off the earth. So while we wait for that, enjoy ‘SCOT’, the giant 7-ft robot who will soon be tracking you with facial recognition at your local airport. He will not, however, be able to stop you from boarding Flight #777!

7-foot-tall ‘SCOT’ robots at Dallas Love Field are watching for unmasked travelers and curbside loiterers

FROM THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS: While not quite Robocop, the machines, nicknamed SCOT, were installed a month ago to “determine if they are capable of efficiently supplementing current airport operations,” said Love Field spokeswoman Lauren Rounds. The robots look like many other kiosks at the airport with a touch screen with wayfinding information, maps of parking garages and directions to ride-hailing and shuttle pickup. But SCOT is much smarter, capable of detecting what people are wearing and even whether they’ve got on a face mask.

Airports have been at the forefront of technology, including facial recognition and other biometrics, for years, a trend that worries privacy advocates who say there are few, if any, laws or guidelines about how emerging technology should be used. Amazon took criticism in 2019 after testing its Rekognition technology with police departments before deciding to ban law enforcement from using it two years later.

Standing over 7’ tall, SCOT is capable of manning and monitoring locations 24/7, and at a fraction of the cost of manned security personnel. The unit’s 360° field of view through four high-positioned, hi-resolution, full-color, always-on digital cameras place eyes on property and periphery unlike any other product.

SCOT can be positioned and engaged to monitor and record both human and vehicle activity in any environment, indoors or outdoors. RAD’s feature of SuspectSpotter uses artificial intelligence for accurate detection of persons – and then can perform a variety of actions based on location, time of day and day of week.

But private businesses and airports have been more aggressive, and the COVID-19 pandemic has spurred more emphasis on touchless interactions using computers. Fort Worth-based American Airlines uses facial recognition for some customers to check bags and airports such as DFW partner with the U.S. State Department for facial recognition technology for incoming passengers.

Surveillance technology hasn’t stopped progressing because the rest of the world was in the midst of a worldwide pandemic. In fact, more and more institutions and companies are using artificial intelligence to monitor spaces, said Adam Schwartz, an attorney for digital privacy rights group Electronic Frontier Foundation.

“It is concerning that an airport has installed a new system of artificial intelligence,” Schwartz said. “It raises a lot of questions about what that technology is doing.”

Love Field is one of two airports to start using the technology from the company Robotic Assistance Devices, said the company’s CEO and founder Steve Reinharz. The other airport, which Reinharz said he was not able to disclose, uses a related technology from the company in parking lots to detour thefts and break-ins.

“This has more of a full-circle purpose to be a regular, physical deterrent,” he said. “That’s the direction the industry has to go because we have some significant labor issues.”

The robotic SCOT kiosks can detect passengers and behavior based on rules set by each user, such as the airport. For instance, people driving up to the curbside drop-off area late at night might get a series of verbal warnings that escalate in volume and severity. Finally, the machine can call police, notify on-site security or even allow someone to make an announcement remotely. The machines can also detect flagged individuals based on what they are wearing, especially if they are in areas susceptible to crime, such as baggage claim, Reinharz said.

License plate-scanning cameras can issue warnings to suspicious vehicles or prompt cars to move along if they’ve been waiting too long in passenger pick-up lanes.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the company said it also pushed a technology that can detect whether subjects are wearing face masks. Face masks have been a point of contention on airplanes but remain a federal mandate until at least April 18.

“The units currently make scheduled and detection-based announcements directed toward our passengers and visitors,” Rounds said. “Some of these focus on reducing vehicular congestion at our curb using license plate recognition and increasing federal mask compliance using facial recognition technology while others provide standard information.”

The airport isn’t paying for the kiosks now while they test the capabilities, but Dallas Love Field did pay about $4,000 to have them shipped to Texas. READ MORE

Dallas Love Field ‘SCOT’ robots are watching passengers, checking for masks and loitering cars

The  giant 7-foot tall robots called SCOT use artificial intelligence to detect passenger behavior, give audible warnings and can even call police or security.

Now The End Begins is your front line defense against the rising tide of darkness in the last Days before the Rapture of the Church

When you contribute to this fundraising effort, you are helping us to do what the Lord called us to do. The money you send in goes primarily to the overall daily operations of this site. When people ask for Bibles, we send them out at no charge. When people write in and say how much they would like gospel tracts but cannot afford them, we send them a box at no cost to them for either the tracts or the shipping, no matter where they are in the world. Even all the way to South Africa. We even restarted our weekly radio Bible study on Sunday nights again, thanks to your generous donations. All this is possible because YOU pray for us, YOU support us, and YOU give so we can continue growing.

But whatever you do, don’t do nothing. Time is short and we need your help right now. If every one of the 15,860+ people on our daily mailing list gave $4.50, we would reach our goal immediately. If every one of our 150,000+ followers on Facebook gave $1.00 each, we would reach 300% of our goal. The same goes for our 15,900 followers on Twitter. But sadly, many will not give, so we need the ones who can and who will give to be generous. As generous as possible.

“Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;” Titus 2:13 (KJV)

“Thank you very much!” – Geoffrey, editor-in-chief, NTEB

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