IT BEGINS: Japan Starts Tagging The Elderly That Have Dementia With QR Codes For Instant Identification

The adhesive QR-coded seals for nails -- part of a free service launched this month and a first in Japan -- measure just one centimetre (0.4 inches) in size. "Being able to attach the seals on nails is a great advantage," a city worker told AFP.
japan-tags-elderly-dementia-with-qr-codes-for-instant-identification

A Japanese city has introduced a novel way to keep track of senior citizens with dementia who are prone to getting lost — tagging their fingers and toes with scannable QR codes.

“And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.” Revelation 13:16,17 (KJV)

EDITOR’S NOTE: We have an unusual amount of Mark of the Beast stories this week, because everywhere you look it’s cropping up more and more. The world is so very close to rolling out the human implantable microchip that will be capable of control buying and selling, transactions, and medical records, and it may just arrive before the Beast does. Think of how easy it will be to roll out…a tiny little chip that connects with a smartly-designed app that sits on your mobile device and viola! It’s all done. Just that fast, too. 

A company in Iruma, north of Tokyo, developed tiny nail stickers, each of which carries a unique identity number to help concerned families find missing loved ones, according to the city’s social welfare office.

The adhesive QR-coded seals for nails — part of a free service launched this month and a first in Japan — measure just one centimetre (0.4 inches) in size.

japan-tags-elderly-dementia-with-qr-codes-for-instant-identification-mark-beast

“Being able to attach the seals on nails is a great advantage,” a city worker told AFP.

“There are already ID stickers for clothes or shoes but dementia patients are not always wearing those items.”

If an elderly person becomes disorientated, police will find the local city hall, its telephone number and the wearer’s ID all embedded in the QR code.

The chips remain attached for an average of two weeks — even if they get wet — the official said, citing recent trials.

Japan is grappling with a rapidly ageing population with senior citizens expected to make up a whopping 40 percent of the population around 2060.

Last month, Japanese police started offering noodle discounts at local restaurants to elderly citizens who agreed to hand in their driving licences.

The offer followed a series of deadly accidents involving elderly drivers — a growing problem in a country where 4.8 million people aged 75 or older hold a licence. source


NTEB is run by end times author and editor-in-chief Geoffrey Grider. Geoffrey runs a successful web design company, and is a full-time minister of the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ. In addition to running NOW THE END BEGINS, he has a dynamic street preaching outreach and tract ministry team in Saint Augustine, FL.
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